Categotry Archives: Social Media

Teen Twitter Takeover with @KidsinMuseums and @HornimanMuseum

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Last August over 50 cultural and heritage organisations across the UK handed their twitter feeds over to teenagers. Teen Twitter Takeover happened in museums, archives, galleries, castle, historic homes and more. All of these venues offered young people a chance to be Social Media Managers – a role that is usually reserved for adults.

Here’s how one teenager from The Horniman Museum as Gardens approached it with emojis.

Last year, the youth panel had the chance to be involved with Teen Twitter Takeover, and our immediate thought was to try and come up with an idea for the day which was really accessible, fun for everyone involved and appealed to other young people – which lead us to dedicate the entire day to one thing: emojis. People would tweet emojis at us, then we would run around the museum and gardens trying to track down and photograph the real life equivalent. It was an exhausting day (especially when someone tweeted a rabbit found in the garden one minute, and a fish from the aquarium the next!) but our idea got a great response on Twitter and we all had a lot of fun doing it. Continue reading →

Guest Blog: Le Rallye: a new lifestyle – Kevin Offelman-Flohic @kev_firitelleg

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Including visitors in a fun and educational mediation practice.

 The 9th of April last, I held in Châteauroux (France) a rallye for two classes of a ‘ZEP’ (an Education Priority Area). It had its own hashtag on Twitter (#rallyeCHTX). At first I thought I would just write about this particular experience and then I wonder: why just stop at that? Why not write about my experience with rallyes? You have to seize the day they say!

Where to start? Châteauroux is a middle-size town in the middle of France, about three hours away from Paris, along the river Indre.

rallye chtx - France

If you were to visit Châteauroux, you would find a little town, with a medieval past, some preserved heritage (a castle, churches, chapels and an industrial heritage) but no real desire to pass this on. Continue reading →

Young Ambassadors free range with @ARTISTROOMS Ron Mueck exhibition at @WolvArtGallery @WAG_ARYA

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ronmueckWe are the ARTISTROOMS Young Ambassadors at Wolverhampton Art Gallery, Sophie, Georgie, Laura and Dan. For nearly a year now, we have been working on, and preparing for, the ARTISTROOMS Ron Mueck exhibition.

Since the very beginning, we have been given a lot of responsibility and freedom by the gallery. We began by planning a bid, outlining all the events, workshops, promotional and documentary material we hoped to create, which we wrote and sent to the Art Fund. Fortunately, they allowed us to do everything we planned and it has been an amazing journey for us!

IMG_7812The first thing we did was plan the publication. We worked alongside a graphic designer to create the short book that follows us doing our stuff for the exhibition. The private view was the first event we helped out at. We were given two boards in the Ron Mueck: In Focus room, where we stuck polaroids of visitors holding up a note book with one word written down, which they chose to sum up the exhibition.

In July, we went on a trip to Ron’s studio in London. When we arrived at the studio, Ron answered the door to greet us and took us up into his crowded, humble workspace. It was an amazing insight into such a private space, where he spends so much of his time. He was so welcoming and polite and he was happy to answer all of our questions. We had asked people on our Twitter, Instagram and Tumblr if they had any questions they wanted us to ask Ron when we were there and we were really pleased to be able to answer those for people.

A few weeks later, we did a creative writing workshop, with inspiration from the pieces in Ron’s exhibition. When we had enough material, we began to compile our publication. This took a lot longer than we anticipated, but we had already organised the launch so we knew we had to get it finished on time. For the launch, we had the ‘Wild Thing’ silent disco, which was on the 23rd August. We put together a play list inspired by Ron’s sculptures and made jungle style decorations. On the day of the disco, we had just received our publications from the print. It was such a relief to have it finished so we were so excited for the launch. The disco was a great success, we had a lot of new people come and support us as well as friends and colleagues at the gallery.

IMG_7814The publication is now on sale in the gallery shop so if you want to take a look at it, that’s where you can find it! We hope that the publication will inspire young people to get involved with programmes like the Young Ambassadors as we have had such a wonderful experience, but we also hope to inspire more galleries to open up more opportunities like this for young people.
We have been on the radio this week, discussing our work and what we are off to do next in our lives, and we all agreed that this experience has helped us in many ways. It has expanded our knowledge, introduced us to new artists, boosted our confidence and gave us once in a lifetime opportunities we will never forget! We have done so much in the last year, that is just a brief overview and we’re not even finished yet!

The Young Ambassadors,
Sophie Meeson, Laura Morgan, Georgie Walters and Dan Crawford.

Guest Blog: An update from our friends at Diamond Friends Forever @DFF_DiaMu

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Senna Theuwissen (25) youngster of Diamond Friends Forever, University Degree in Fine Arts and studying Social Work, specialization in Art and Culture Mediation. 

An addition to the posts from Nathalie, Brent and Claudia to keep you updated about our experiences and progress realizing the Pop-Up Diamond Museum.

In less than a few days the museum will open the doors to the public. We are finishing the last details but also making a new start by building up our ideas and letting them get to life. A lot still has to be done, but bit by bit it is taking shape. The vernissage is Tuesday the 2nd of July and the museum will be officially open on Wednesday the 3rd of July. I am looking forward to the weekend before the grand opening because we all will come back together to help Nathalie and Brent with all kinds of things that still have to be done. After weeks of separation because of work or exams we will be reunited.

Continue reading →

Diamond Friends Forever Guest blog June 17th @DFF_DiaMu

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By Claudia Demaeght (youngster of DFF)

As mentioned in the last blog of Nathalie and Brent I, as a member of the group communication, will elaborate on the subject of social media.

2013-05-18 12.45.59To introduce the project and make our target group enthusiastic to visit our museum, the group communication received a budget. The budget wasn’t very large, but that was rather a challenge than a threat to us. One of the cheapest ways to communicate these days is through social media and because youngsters are very present on the social media, this was one of the main elements of our communication plan.

We divided our plan into 4 subgroups, namely: online communication, guerilla marketing, offline communication and press. I will tell you a bit more about these parts that integrate social media.

communicatie 2In our group, Justin, Jacob and I discussed al lot on the subject of social media. Eventually we confined ourselves to the 2 most popular among youngsters: Facebook and Twitter. We thought this was the most efficient way to reach our target audience. Brent and Nathalie made a Facebook-account for DFF at the beginning of the project, and with more than 250 likes this was already a good medium to reach a lot of people. We want to use Facebook for both information and fun.  You will find information like where, when, who and why but also pictures and crazy facts about diamonds bearing in mind the ‘ like and share principle ‘. We want to make sure that people like our page and share things they like with their friends. Starting from the launch of our guerilla marketing campaign we want to use our campaign image as cover image on the page. That way the campaign image will be well-known by our visitors.

89b0f2541b87432d4806e2017bfabde9Twitter was the second social networking site we decided to use. We use Twitter to reach more international audience. Therefore we deliberately communicate in English. Because you are restricted to 140 characters we will use it to post short informational messages but also short fun facts about diamonds. Other social media we thought about to use were Instagram, Pinterest and Tumblr. In Belgium our target audience is not as present on these social media as in America and the UK so we decided to just focus on Facebook and Twitter.

Facebook and Twitter are not the best channels to tell the whole DFF-story, that’s why a WordPress website is being created right now. My co-worker Justin is a handyman when it comes to graphic design so I am already curious to see the result!

fashionableBecause we were encouraged by Nathalie and Brent to think outside the box we wanted to create something fun and unexpected for the guerilla action, something that people will talk about. The winning idea was to distribute a lot of saddle covers for bicycles on places that youngsters and tourist will visit during the period before and during the launch of the museum. Kind of a saddle cover raid! On these covers the DFF-website will be mentioned and here the visitors can participate in a contest to win a real diamond!

The DFF-Facebook and Twitter page will also be present on all the offline media like on beer mats, posters, postcards, flyers and on trams. I hope by the launch of the museum we have a lot of ‘likes’ and ‘followers’… and that our efforts will be rewarded!

You can still visit us on Facebook (DFFDiamondFriendsForever) ,Twitter (DFF_DiaMu) and soon on www.diamondfriedsforever.be!

How useful is social media for raising awareness about the Holocaust and genocide #WLdebate

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Guest Blog from Katy at Wiener Library

wldebateTo mark Holocaust Memorial Day 2013, the Wiener Library’s Young Volunteers hosted a special debate about social media. Ten young people aged 16-25 came together to discuss the question ‘How useful is social media for raising awareness about the Holocaust and genocide?’. Chaired by the Library’s Community and Outreach Officer, the following questions formed the outline of the debate:

1)    If it’s ‘social’ media, is it suitable for raising awareness of a sensitive topic such as the Holocaust?

2)    Are there differences between the ways social media can be used to raise awareness about the past as opposed to the present?

3)    Memorialisation, learning and taking action? Can social media do anything more than awareness raising?

4)    Where should social media be placed amongst traditional methods of raising awareness of the Holocaust (eg school teaching, museums, films, literature)

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Credit: Ben Turner and The Wiener Library

5)    Are certain types of social media better than others for raising awareness of the Holocaust and genocide?

6)    If we can’t control what gets written on Twitter, is it actually useful at all?

7)    Where do you see the role of social media in the future in terms of raising awareness of the Holocaust?

Some of the key points from the debate were published on the Wiener Library twitter account so the wider public were able to engage with the debate. The responses can still be seen (and replied to!) by searching the hashtag #WLdebate.

Credit: Ben Turner and The Wiener Library

Credit: Ben Turner and The Wiener Library

Lots of interesting points were made but the overall consensus was that social media was a useful ‘way in’ for people in terms of raising awareness. They argued that it had the potential to capture people’s attention and inspire them to learn more as well as take action. One attendee was less positive and worried that social media was a ‘shallow form of engagement’, but that didn’t mean it was not useful, just that it was useful for catching attention rather than deep and meaningful learning. Someone following the discussion on Twitter argued that writing a survivor story in 140 characters (regarding the Holocaust Education Trust’s ‘ask a survivor’ Twitter chat for Holocaust Memorial Day) would lose the historical context, but the group argued that the fact people were asking survivors questions at all via twitter showed some level of positive engagement.

After the debate finished, it was suggested by the attendees that a new online presence was created for them to carry on their discussions. The Library consequently created a debate group on Facebook for those young people and others to discuss ideas and put forward potential future debate topics. We will be holding another debate in the autumn so keep following the #WLdebate!

 

Using Online Courses to Connect Teens to Museums @NCMATeens

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ncmateensContinuing with our ‘sharing of social media and other online activities’ to engage Teens and Young People, Michelle H. Harrell, mharrell@ncartmuseum.org, Coordinator of Teen and College Programs at North Carolina Museum of Art shares their online courses available in North Carolina.

If you’re reading this blog, you may already know the challenge museums face reaching local teens. When given the challenge of reaching teens across a state spanning 560 miles (900 km), the issues are challenging. Our museum has discovered how online courses can offer a tool to connect teens to their state art museum in rich and meaningful ways.

As a statemuseum, the North Carolina Museum of Art (NCMA has initiated a variety of concept-driven programs for teachers and schools across the state. Through a grant-funded collaboration with the North Carolina Virtual Public School (NCVPS), we have created a series of online high school credit courses at no cost to students enrolled in a public school in NC. Rather than offering traditional art history courses, we offer a variety of popular subjects, such as game design, videography, fashion, advertising, and photography. Visit http://ncartmuseum.org/virtual_public_school/ to learn more about each course.

These online courses combine object-based approaches in the galleries with project-based applications. Works of art are used as catalysts for learning. Each course meets the following goals. Students will…

  • Build learning and innovation skills while increasing media and technology skills.
  • Engage with the art collections of the NCMA regardless of their geographic location across NC.
  • Participate in educational programming at the NCMA, both during and after enrollment in the courses.

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Videos of artists and curators combined with exciting projects and discussion forums create authentic experiences for students to construct meaningful connections to the work. Each week, students learn new concepts, connect these concepts to a work of art, and then create original work that synthesizes what they have learned. For instance, in our “Art of Photography” course, students master technical agility of photographic processes while developing aesthetic perception and creativity. In the first module of the course, students learn about artist intent while understanding how a camera’s lens operates. Students watch this video featuring Chris Drury’s Cloud Chamber for the Trees and Sky to hear his artistic approach and watch a timelapse of how the small aperture projects the outside of the park to the walls of the sculpture.

Enrollment in these courses has doubled each year. The pilot course offered in Fall 2010 had only 60 students, but the current semester has over 300 students enrolled. By the end of next school year, we expect the enrollment to exceed 500 students each semester. In only three years of offering these online courses, over half of NC’s school systems have had at least one student enrolled in our program.

ElizabethMOn-site educational programming draws upon the themes of these courses. From symposia, residencies, field trips, and events, students have multiple entry points to engage with our museum. We just celebrated the debut of the Art of Photography course with ArtScene, which is our teen event  held each spring at the NCMA. Students enjoyed photography activities, a polaroid photo booth, live entertainment, and a student exhibition from the course.

As our program grows, we are interested in collaborating with other museums to contribute to the field of online learning. How has your museum incorporated online learning to connect to teens? What other museums can be used as examples to engage teens through distance learning? Join the conversation by adding comments below or contacting me directly (mharrell@ncartmuseum.org).

NCMA Social Media
Twitter
Facebook

Museums, Teens and Social Media: @TeenArtGallery

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tagRecently, I’ve been asking for Teen groups to share how social media fits into their program.  If you would like to share your views, please let us know.

This is a response By Charlotte Bravin Lee, age 17 Director and Curator of Teen Art Gallery.

I don’t particularly embrace technology. Most of my friends are better with computers than I am. I have always preferred a pencil and pad or a paintbrush and canvas.  I was the last to give up my flip phone in favor of a smart phone. But a year ago, when I became the director of Teen Art Gallery, I realized I wanted to increase awareness about our group. At the time we had about 350 “likers”.  My goal was to double this number within a year – and we have succeeded. I found that the more posts we created with images attached really helped. We used pictures from our various openings. We posted young teen art work. Every time we share a post from another museum group, we earn new “fans” and increase our profile. Continue reading →