Categotry Archives: teens in museums

UK: Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery Style Africa @BM_AG

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Style Africa

The popularity of textiles with museum visitors across a range of ages led to the Style Africa exhibition at Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery…

Supported by the HLF’s Young Roots programme and open until 2 September, Style Africa has been led by a team of 29 young people in partnership with staff at BirminghamMuseumandArtGallery. Through a series of hands-on sessions, site visits and meetings with local West African clothing retailers and designers, the group explored the changing traditions of woven, embroidered, printed and dyed clothing and textiles from Ghana, Nigeria and Sierra Leone. The final exhibition also features a film made by young people from the Drum Arts Centre, who sharing their impressions of West African cloth.

The young people became involved for many different reasons, some for their interest in African textiles:

“I wanted to learn about West African culture in a hands-on way” says Liberty,

“I love the colours, the patterns and the meanings. Each textile tells a different story, which is something you don’t get with clothes from the high street” says Abbey.

Others took part to develop new skills:

“It was great to have an insight into what curating an exhibition involves” comments Sophie

Style Africa was also an opportunity for some of the participants to learn about their heritage:

“I took part because I’m from Sierra Leone and textiles are important in my culture” explains Bascilia.

Hayley Dutfield, discusses her involvement further:

“It was a great opportunity to voice what younger people would like to see in an exhibition. I’m particularly interested in the techniques so Style Africa was a way to showcase some of the historical cloth alongside more contemporary creations. During the workshops, we learnt about the different types of cloth and their importance in West African culture. As a group we were able to discuss, debate and decide on all elements of the exhibition; from choosing what textiles to exhibit, to the styling, layout and construction of the gallery space. Overall we wanted the exhibition to be an enjoyable experience that leaves a strong visual impact on the visitor”.

 
Style Africa
Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery
For more information, visit www.bmag.org.uk/events?id=1797

 

Teens in Museums Manifesto #teensinmuseums

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Teenagers are a hard to label group, although many have tried: Millennials, Generation We, Global Generation, the Millennial Generation, and Generation Next.  Regardless of the title we or anyone else give them, the fact is they are currently a stealth group in the cultural world — but this, happily, is changing.

Internationally, Teens in Museums and Culture are slowly getting the respect, time and resources needed to help build programs that they want, rather than programs that we think they want or that tick boxes. This is due to an influx of dedicated personnel who are inviting teens in to museums, taking the time to listen, and providing them the space and opportunity to let them create their own programs, to be involved in new exhibitions, and to have an impact on institutions and culture in their communities.

At the very least, every program should provide a platform for teens to share their thoughts, ideas, and passions.  If resources allow, progressive programs should assist the teens in providing them a channel to convert the ideas into a reality. For example, let them take over an area in the museum or gallery and listen to where they want the placement of artefacts. Or allow them to change the labels to be teen friendlier (and in ‘Plain English’). Share their voices with those of senior staff members and vice versa.

Many of us know of, or have at least heard of, programs like this.  The real challenge is sustainability.  How can we ensure the ‘Millennial Generation’ are allowed to forge their mark in the cultural world in a way that is both meaningful and realistic but also provides value to museums and galleries, as well as their visitors?

This challenge is different for each venue.

Excellent examples in the United States include Milwaukee Art Museum, Museum Teen Summit, and the Smithsonian EdLab; here within the UK, the Museum of London’s Youth Panel and Wolverhampton Art Gallery’s Art Forum each provide a dedicated platform for teens to work with the venue on a long-term bases, and most importantly with purpose.

Purpose, we feel, is key.

Being a teenager is difficult; you’re finding your feet. You’re not a child anymore, but you’re not quite an adult. You don’t want to be patronised, but you still need guidance while you establish yourself and gain confidence. So purpose and value is crucial. If what you are doing has a result and will change, enhance, or enrich yourself, the cultural institution, and/or the local, national, or global community, then it has purpose. It’s not an easy balance to achieve but it can be done, and we’ve seen it being done well.

With all this in mind, we felt an International Teens in Museum Decree/Manifesto was required.

  1. Listen to what Teens are saying. Answer their questions, question them, and work together to find answers and solutions.
  2. Engage with Teens; don’t patronize them.
  3. Provide achievable challenges which can created sustainable solutions.
  4. Promote learning as a challenge for Teens to solve.
  5. Create an environment where Teens can explore digital media where appropriate.
  6. Bring teens into projects from the start, not as an after thought.
  7. Provide adequate space and time for challenges to be achieved.
  8. Be flexible.  Many teens can’t commit to meeting same time every week.
  9. Don’t make assumptions. (For example, not all Teens have Facebook or iPhones.)
  10. Let teens actively build your institution’s assets.

What are your thoughts? Are you working with teens?  If so, we’d love to hear from you!  

Please join us on  Twitter, Facebook and Linkedin 

Teens in Museums is a coalition with Mar DixonMilwaukee Art Museum, Museum Teen Summit, and the Smithsonian EdLab (NB Museum of London Youth Panel joined as of Sept 28)

If you would like your venue to get involved, please let us know. 

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