Categotry Archives: UK

The @JewishMuseumLDN Anti-Valentines Event

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In the post Sahava Baranow, project manager at the Jewish Museum’s Anti-Valentine Event, shares what the event was all about:

flyerDuring an early morning seminar in the first couple of weeks of the MA Museum Studies at UCL, our degree coordinator approached the class with a potential project. The Jewish Museum was planning a Late event that would be developed by students to go with their temporary exhibition Blood that drew together art, film and literature to present a rich exploration of how blood can unite and divide. The aim of the event was to attract a younger and culturally engaged audience. It sounded like a great chance to get some practical experience and take part in something innovative and enjoyable. Five of us were interested and the Jewish Museum got in touch to set up an initial meeting and explain our individual roles.

One project manager, three programmers, and one marketing officer would develop the event. The Jewish Museum was going to support us wherever possible, but we were in charge. Having managed some projects in the past, I decided to go for the role of project manager. Managing a project of this size and meeting the expectations of the museum, our degree coordinator, and all of my friends who had promised to come along created a lot of pressure to deliver a successful event, but besides being nervous, I was also excited. Continue reading →

Guest Blog by Karan from Florence Nightingale Museum Young Panel

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This is a guest blog written by Karan Ishii about her time at Florence Nightingale Museum as part of the youth panel this summer

100_0052This summer, I had the privilege and pleasure to be a member of the Florence Nightingale Museum Youth Panel in London. Having moved to England the summer before, I had decided to make whatever positive contribution I could give to local organizations. The Panel consisted of myself and two other girls as well as our supervisor, Ms. Stephanie Tyler. As a team, we developed a project for the Kiss of Light Exhibit in the museum, which highlights the role of nurses in light therapy in 20th century Britain. The exhibit, which ends October 23, 2015, tells of the use of sun sanctuaries and direct light therapy to combat diseases and illnesses.

For our project, we had a number of options in terms of angles we could take on this subject. In the end, we decided on educating our target audience of teens about the effects of sun on health through writing passages for a booklet, blog, and infographic. This was our first time working on a campaign and it was a really great experience learning of the workings of a museum especially the behind the scenes work. Hameda and Lydia participated with the Kids in Museums Twitter Takeover day, where they tweeted our journey through our project while educating the public of sun safety.

100_0062During one meeting, panel member Lydia and I worked with poet Simon Barraclough, who wrote Sunspots, in a poetry workshop. The result was a compilation poem that personifies the sun as insistent and loud in mornings but also bitterly considers cloudy, English days where the sun is no where to be seen. I am very proud of our poem, as I have previously had a slight distaste for poetry, but truly enjoyed composing this particular poem.

The lasting part of being a part of the youth panel was enjoying meeting and working with people that I most definitely would not have met had I not decided to join the panel. It was wonderful making new friends and making the small difference that we could and fascinating to learn about Florence and her impact today. With a steady supply of Starburst as our fuel, we plowed through research and came out proud to have been a part of an amazing team!

To see a blog post by panel member Hameda, please visit https://florencenightingalemuseum.wordpress.com/2015/10/01/summer-at-the-florence-nightingale-museum/ 

The Florence Nightingale Museum
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#MysteryTour programme returns – January to March 2015 @wipartsuk and @priorityfive

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Are you aged in 11-25, based in Birmingham/West Midlands region and interested in being a young consultant for heritage venue? Well this programme is for you!

The Mystery Tour programme is back for 2015 and we have lots of very exciting venues that we will be visiting this year across the West Midlands region.

Below is some information where we will be going.
Get involved in the Mystery Tour Programme, please follow the link and fill out your contact details here

 

UPCOMING DATES
1) Saturday 24th January 2015: Red House Glass Cone in Stourbridge
Red House Glass Cone
Lying in the heart of the Stourbridge glassmaking industry, the Red House Glass Cone was built at the end of the 18th century and was used for the manufacture of glass until 1936. Reaching 100 feet, it is the only complete Glass Cone in the area and one of only four left in the United Kingdom. With the aid of film, audio guides, exhibits and live demonstrations, you can now explore the Cone’s 200 years of glassmaking history.

 

2) Saturday 31st January 2015: Mystery Tour visioning day at The Drum

On this day we will be reflecting on past visits and visioning for the future of this project. We are looking to formally recruit Heritage Ambassadors who will be working with the Mystery Tour team to attend conferences and events, share their knowledge and give specialist advice and guidance to organisations, share the story of the Mystery Tour programme to date, and help to invite new young people to take part in the project.

 

3) Wednesday 18th February 2015: Aston Hall

 

Aston Hall

 

Aston Hall is a grade 1 listed Jacobean House located in Aston and built between 1618 and 1635. In 1864 the house was bought by Birmingham Corporation, becoming the first historic country house to pass into municipal ownership, and is now a community museum managed by Birmingham Museums Trust. It boasts a series of period rooms which have furniture, paintings, textiles and metalwork from the collections of the Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery.

 

4) Saturday 21st February 2015: Heritage Motor Centre

 

Heritage Motor Centre

The Heritage Motor Centre is home to the world’s largest collection of British Cars; it boasts nearly 300 cars in its collection which span the classic, vintage and veteran eras and is a mecca for car enthusiasts.

5) Saturday 28th February 2015: The Old House
The Old House

 

The Old House is a remarkably well preserved example of a 17th Century timber-framed building and is situated in the heart of Hereford, surrounded by the commercial centre of the city. Built in 1621, it is a startling sight, standing as the sole reminder of times-gone-by in the middle of a modern shopping precinct. It is furnished in period style with an internationally important collection of English Oak furniture and rare wall-paintings.

 

Hereford Museum and Art Gallery
hereford-library

 

Hereford Museum and Art Gallery, housed in a spectacular Victorian gothic building, has been exhibiting artefacts and works of fine and decorative art connected with the local area since 1874. Although the exterior of the building has changed very little the museum and gallery have kept up with the times. Exhibits include a hive of live bees, a two-headed calf, a two metre long fish, swords of every shape and size, elements of costume and textiles and much more besides.

 

6) Saturday 7th March 2015: Soho House

 

Soho House

 

Soho House was once a regular meeting place for some of the greatest minds of the 18th century. It was in the dining room of this elegant house that Matthew Boulton, one of the country’s first industrialists, entertained the leading scientists and inventors of the industrial age including James Watt, Erasmus Darwin, Josiah Wedgwood and Joseph Priestly where they discussed ideas and presented discoveries that continue to affect our lives today.

 

7) Saturday 21st March 2015: Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery
Shrewsbury museum

 

Shrewsbury Museum and Art Gallery is set in a remarkable group of historic buildings including the town’s old Music Hall. The collections offer people imaginative opportunities to actively engage in Shropshire’s heritage and help them to experience the unique offer of which the County provides. They currently have a temporary exhibition called ‘Secret Eygpt’ with 150 objects including statuary, coffins, ceramics, jewellery and animal and human mummies.

 

Shropshire Regimental Museum
Shropshire Regimental Museum

Based at Shrewsbury Castle, the Shropshire Regimental Museum Trust includes pictures, uniforms, medals, silverware, weapons and other artefacts from the 18th Century to the present day. The oldest parts of the Castle were built during the reign of William the Conqueror and it became a major border fortress in the Middle Ages. After falling into disrepair in the 1300s, the Castle was revived to become a domestic residence in the late 16th century. Refortified and briefly besieged during the Civil Wars, the Castle was returned to a domestic use under Charles II. In the late 18th century Thomas Telford remodelled the Great Hall as a private house, which it remained until just after World War One.

If you would like to be involved in the Mystery Tour Programme, please follow the link and fill out your contact details: http://goo.gl/forms/r94xZq1UvX.

 

Any further queries in the meantime, please drop me a line - holly@workinprogress.uk.com.

 

Follow us at @wipartsuk and @priorityfive // #mysterytour.
 
 

 

Talking Objects Collective: Working in Co-production with Community Partners @BritishMuseum

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Written by: Reagan Kiser, Community Partnerships Coordinator, The British Museum

OC final performance 016Talking Objects Collective is an object-based youth engagement programme led by the Community Partnerships Team at The British Museum. The programme aims to bring young people (aged 16-24) together with the Museum and its collections in support of their accredited learning. Since 2012 the British Museum has worked with nine partner organisations, from fashion design students at Working Men’s College, to charities for vulnerable, disengaged, or at-risk young people, including Street League and Dance United. While each group brings their own creative process to the project, one thing remains the same: we work collaboratively to develop a creative response to one key object in the collection, the Lewis Chessmen. The Lewis Chessmen are highlights of The British Museum’s collections, a beautiful and mysterious medieval chess set found on a beach in the Isle of Lewis in Scotland.

OC final performance 063Each Talking Objects project allows an important opportunity for creative risk-taking for its participants, our community partners, museum staff, and also for creative practitioners brought in to support the young people. The responses developed by the young people in co-production with the museum challenge our ideas about what can and should happen in the galleries. For example, we have had heard eloquent proposal pitches for new works of art designed for the Fourth Plinth in Trafalgar Square, listened to collaborative poems inspired by individual characters from the Lewis Chessmen, and seen fashion designs inspired by patterns on the chess pieces. Recently, we staged a contemporary dance choreographed by young people from Dance United around the narrative of the Lewis Chessmen, and hosted an evening’s site-specific performance in the galleries (using theatre, dance and spoken word to unlock the mysteries of the Chessmen) by young people from OnlyConnect.

DSC_0465Each project is co-produced with our community partner, so that weekly sessions are customised to meet the skills development needs of the group. For example, when working with OnlyConnect, the young people used half of each weekly session at the Museum to develop their drama pieces in the galleries and to engage with and perform for visitors. They worked with a storyteller to focus on key characters in the Lewis Chessmen (from the queen to the knight) and then developed three stories that would encourage an audience (of 50!) to follow them from the Asia galleries to Africa galleries and beyond to reveal the mysteries of the unused chess set and its “lost queen.” Another example is when we met the Dance United group for the first time. We decided with the partners that the best way to shape the project and to build up the young people’s confidence in working with the Museum was to actually take part in one of their intensive dance sessions at their studio. Lorna and I definitely broke the ice this way, and by working alongside the troupe learned about the complex process of choreography and the skills they were interested in developing through the project. From film-making and editing skills, to fashion and jewellery design, we have collaborated with local creative practitioners to develop participants’ responses to the object, and sessions at the museum, and to provide them with new experiences and exposure to career paths. The methodology of Talking Objects is object-based exploration and discussion, so we start with young peoples’ personal connections and ideas about the objects, and end by encouraging them to use the objects and museums on their own terms for their future creative projects.

DSC_0459Perhaps the legacy of this type of collaborative work will be to change perceptions (on both sides) of how young people can use museums, and to raise their confidence with accessing culture and heritage. We also feel that by providing a public forum for the participants’ responses, the young people advocate for their place in museums. As an added benefit, by working closely with our partners who are specialists in youth engagement, we have had the opportunity to share and learn best practice. We have learned new strategies for engaging young people, are more aware of the challenges and rewards of this type of work, and have encouraged our partners to consider objects as dynamic platforms for their own creative practice. The best way to describe the partnership work is to link to an amazing blog post by one of the Only Connect participants about her experience with Talking Objects Collective at The British Museum.

Talking Objects Collective is funded by John Lyon’s Charity. For more information, please contact Lorna Cruickshanks, Community Partnerships Coordinator lcruickshanks@britishmuseum.org

Chessmen groupjpg

 

Engaging Young People: Top Tips for Starting a Youth Panel @GeffryeYouth

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By Eileen Gbagbo, member of the Geffrye Museum Youth Advisory Panel

photo 8On Monday 6th October 2014, I and 5 other members of the Geffrye  Museum’s youth programme and Youth Advisory Panel, also known as the ‘YAP’, co-led the Kids in Museums  ’Starting a Youth Panel’ workshop in order to give our opinions on the Youth Panels, like what makes them successful and how they are run, etc. I volunteered to speak at the workshop, because I have really enjoyed being part of the YAP and I do believe that organisations such as museums, that aren’t exactly associated with or appealing to young people, should have something along the lines of a youth panel in order to break the stereotype. Honestly, I didn’t know what to expect from this workshop.

Before this event, the YAP had created the ’10 Top Tips for Starting a Youth Panel’ booklet. This is meant to be a tool designed to help anyone who is thinking about starting up a youth panel realise the important elements from the young people’s perspective.  The tips ranged from making sure that there was enough food at every meeting to making sure everyone put ideas forward, but in my opinion, the most important ‘Top Tip’ to me was about having unique opportunities within the museum or youth panel so that members could feel rewarded for their contribution. Our booklet was very eye-catching and informative at the same time; you can read it here.

photo 11The workshop started at 1pm, but we met at 12 o’clock just to run over some last-minute things. When the guests had arrived, we and the Kids in Museums staff introduced ourselves and all of the delegates took it in turn to say their name and where they’re from. Next, with the help of Vanessa (Young People’s Programme Coordinator at the Geffrye), we then spoke about each of the ‘Ten Top Tips’ in some detail and explained why we felt they were important in running and setting up a youth panel. After this daunting task, which seemed to take forever, we then sat at a table each in order to talk to those on the table and answer any of their queries.  Then it was the Kids in Museums’ infamous ‘Five Minute Blasts’. This involved 5 speakers, who have had experience with different youth groups, speaking for 5 minutes.  All the participants were then encouraged to write any questions they had on post-it notes, which were then sorted into different categories during the break.  After the coffee break, the delegates then sat on the table with the category which they were most interested in. YAP members sat on each of the tables and answered as many questions as possible. This was really interesting as we really engaged with the guests as they were really interested in running youth panels.  Afterwards, the participants wrote themselves a promise on a postcard which the Kids in Museums staff will post to them soon as a reminder.  Then we all filled in evaluation cards and the event ended around 4.30.

At the event, I learnt a lot of interesting things about youth panels, especially about the financial aspects. Its very hard for museums to get money to fund youth panels, so we talked about possible fundraising opportunities and ways to save money. Overall, speaking at the event helped my confidence and gave me the chance to speak about something quite important to me. Being part of the Geffrye YAP has given me many opportunities and has helped me grow in confidence and skills such as time management and planning and supporting large-scale events. Earlier this year, I also had the opportunity to complete a Silver Arts Award, and through that I have gained a lot of creative skills and arts knowledge.

 

Teens present ‘Sores, Spores & Sickly Bugs’ at Centre of the Cell @CentreoftheCell

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DSC00006On Tuesday 5th August, a group of 14-18 year olds from across East London came together at Centre of the Cell  to present ‘Spores, Sores & Sickly Bugs’, an exciting new workshop for families about the medical history of the East End. Since October 2013 the group, who are part of Centre of the Cell’s Youth Membership, have been busy conducting research, developing their ideas and creating a set of hands-on workshop stations, resulting in a performance that is entertaining as well as educational.

Funding from the Heritage Lottery Fund provided the young people with the opportunity to conduct research in a number of different and exciting ways. They visited the Royal London Hospital Museum and Archives, helped host a lecture on the history of drugs and even took a historical tour of Whitechapel to investigate its hidden medical mysteries. They also enjoyed training with the Head of Learning and Project Coordinator to develop practical workshop leading skills, and visited the Old Operating Theatre Museum and Wellcome Collection to find out more about medical and history collections and interpretation.

DSC00030As a result of their research, the young people selected four aspects of medical history they found particularly interesting, and each was used to create a station for the workshop: ‘Anaesthetics’, ‘Children & Disease’, ‘Equipment & Antisepsis’, and ‘Disease & the East End’. Scripts were written, props were made and presentations were rehearsed in time for testing the workshop with families from the local area at the Watney Market Idea Store. Some further refining resulted in stations that were fun and informative. Members of the audience, both young and old, left with a deepened understanding and enthusiasm for medical history. After delivering workshops onsite over the Easter 2014 school holidays, the team trained a new group of 14 – 18 year olds to deliver the workshop over the Summer 2014 school holidays.

IMG_2475Despite being a little nervous, the group delivered a fantastic workshop, leaving the young members of the project with a sense of accomplishment and pride. They described the experience as ‘challenging but so much fun’, and they all gained a deeper understanding of what is involved in organising event and working with a team, as well as developing their communication and presentation skills. They had to work together overcome issues such as time constraints and audience members talking over them, and as a result they developed new friendships and met a huge variety of people, which they described as ‘exciting and a completely unique experience’. The group can’t wait to repeat the show in the coming week: ‘Spores, Sores & Sickly Bugs’ will be delivered again at Centre of the Cell on Thursday 7th and Tuesday 12th August 2014.

To book a place for one of these workshops, please visit http://centreofthecell.eventbrite.co.uk/

To find out more about Centre of the Cell’s ‘Sores, Spores & Sickly Bugs’ project, and the read the website content the young people created, visit http://www.centreofthecell.org/centre/?page_id=352&ks=3.

 

 

What is Dig It! 2015? @DigIt2015

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digitWhat is Dig It! 2015?
This is going to be a year-long, country-wide celebration of Scottish archaeology, run on behalf of the heritage sector by the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland and Archaeology Scotland

There is already a lot planned for next year and we are compiling an exciting programme of events drawn from a whole range of organisations (we are taking a very holistic approach to what is considered ‘archaeology’!).

Why are we doing it?
We want as many people as possible to find out about archaeology and to contribute to the big story of Scotland’s past.  This is a past and story which belongs to all of us, and the events and programmes which run through the year will provide people with a range of activities from theatre performances to exhibitions, open days and discovery sessions, so that as wide a range of Scotland’s population can get involved.

What can you do?
We are especially looking for events that actively involve 16-24 year olds, whether that’s those who are in school, college or university or a local youth or scout group.  This part of the programme is still in development, so we are looking for ideas, as well as organisations and groups who want to be involved.

You might have an idea about putting on an archaeology activity or you might just want to be kept informed of events in your area where you could go along and find out more.  We are especially keen to get people out to actually visit sites and places of historical/archaeological interest, and to take some time to explore the heritage around them.

Whatever your interest, if you would like to be involved, then please take a look at our website www.digit2015.com for more information get in touch with your ideas!

Review of mystery shoppers Lichfield @WiPArtsUK / @priorityfive 

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@priorityfiveSo, to introduce myself,  I am a recently employed apprentice for Work In Progress my name is Jamie Scott . This review, as you may notice from title, is about our mystery shoppers programme which I assist as a support  to the coordinators and facilitators and to handle the documentary side of our project.

With our mystery shoppers project we work in partnership with a vast amount of museums to help them attract a younger generation of the community because, lets face it, museums are not a hotspot attraction for young people!

I can speak for myself regarding this matter because I am also one of those young people who had assumed all museums are boring.  I suppose I  had this approach because I never took interest in them or no one ever suggested going when I was younger.  It was all about going to the cinemas or playing pool with my friends, so really museums would be a last choice hotspot to be honest.

So, thinking about the programme, we basically work with museums and bring in a group of young people who will visit the venues and browse the many features it has to offer and then give their feedback on how the museums can make it more attractive to the younger generation!

Here are a few pictures I took from our recent trip to Litchfield which I edited leftleft top

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some of the young people like to channel their feedback in a creative way (as seen above) so once the young people have had a tour of the venue, we as a group, and the museum sit down and have a group discussion. We spoke about what features they like best also what they could improve on. How they could input changes in order to make it more young people friendly and accessible to all people, who may not be as fortunate to experience the features that the venue has to offer due to certain physical disabilities.  

Samuel Johnson Birthplace Museum Lichfield center This was our first stop in Lichfield one of two venues we were visiting and the first assessment began. As I followed the young people around the building the structure consisted of 5 floors each containing certain historic pieces relating to the man himself Samuel Johnson. As the young people toured the building they took notes. These were then presented to the venues employee’s and we discussed the positives and the negatives. I managed to capture some of the moments which are below.

bottom rightbottom left

left toprighttop

Erasmus Darwin House

This was the second and our final venue of the day fresh from having our lunch we headed over to the Erasmus Darwin House where we were  greeted by a wonderful cared for garden that the venue looked after. Once  we had made our way through the garden we were greeted by the employees of the museum and ran through the health and safety procedures.

Once inside, there were suggestions to work your way through the building starting from the bottom floor working your way up. There were two floors to this venue, the young people’s interests seemed to be similar to the other venue, very interested in dressing up! They all managed to influence all the other young people into taking part  also the two deliverers of the project Liz Howell and Ruth Richardson. We had a tour of the venue and we had another brief review given by the young people to the employee’s of the venue about their favourite and not so favourite things.

There were a lot of favorites in this venue similar the first, so the review went rather well, the one thing that seemed to be a bit of a let down from one of the young person’s review named Hamsah, who couldn’t access the many features due to a physical disability which meant he was unable to touch or reach elements of the exhibits because it was all mounted in a difficult hard-to-reach way. He was unable to touch, to feel the texture or smell when there were certain scented items.

He was very concerned about the lack of accessibility for disabled people when he questioned why there was a lift for disabled people to reach the second floor but the access out of the lift included steps!

I felt this was a very good point and something the whole group commented on and we reflected on historic buildings and their access limitations.

Regarding the rest of the review, we gave the young people some stationery and craft bits and they were left to construct a response to a project proposed by Ruth and the team. They then fed back their opinions through their creativeness and in ways that they enjoy including written word, mind maps, art pieces and group drawings. This was also reviewed by one the venue’s employee’s. I’m looking forward to the next trip and to hear the outcome and reaction or changes that are made by these two Lichfield venues!

Guest Blog: Courtauld Institute of Art Young People’s Programme @CourtauldYP

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Introduction:

Nottingham 1The Courtauld Institute of Art’s young people’s programme is unusual in its function compared to most other galleries. The Courtauld itself has two sides: the Gallery that holds a world-renowned collection spanning 900 years, and The Institute which is the leading centre for the study of art history in the UK. It is this meeting of a gallery and higher education that gives the young people’s programme a specific framework to work within. Known as ‘widening participation’ within the UK higher education sector, this has become one of the key aims of The Courtauld’s new Public Programmes Department since it was established in June 2007. This aim is that not only art and culture should be available to everyone whatever their economic background or personal circumstances, but studying at The Courtauld should be within all young people’s reach.

As a small, single-subject university teaching art history, which is mainly absent from state school curricula, The Courtauld Institute of Art faces an unusual challenge in its widening participation programme. Taking on this challenge we have a number of programmes including Art History Beyond London. Established in 2012, this programme builds partnerships with schools and FE colleges outside London. The sessions are designed to raise awareness of contemporary art history, at the same time as promoting The Courtauld as a potential university destination. They are held in part at schools and in part at local art galleries including Nottingham Contemporary, Site Gallery, and Manchester Art Gallery. Twenty students attended the pilot of this programme, held in Nottingham, and I am now happy to report that two students from this took up a place on the BA course in September 2013, and another will begin in September 2014.

One of these students wanted to talk to you about her experience of the Art History Beyond London programme, so here she is!

Sheffield 2 I first heard about The Courtauld Institute of Art through my History of Art A level course at New College Nottingham after discovering that many of the artworks I was studying were at The Courtauld Gallery. I later experienced the Institute itself through The Courtauld’s outreach programme, Art History Beyond London, a number of workshopsheld at New College Nottingham. The day included learning the methodologies of art history, how to read an image,a curation mini-task and visit to Nottingham Contemporarywhere I was exposed to video artist’s Mika Rottenberg’s video art. Her exploration of capitalism’s cruelties, closed communities and the hardship experienced by labourers in a world of globalisation drew me further into the concepts in modern art.

The day was a rare opportunity to speak to a representative from The Courtauld to understand not just the possibilities that The Courtauld Institute can offer but also gave me a stronger grasp of what it could be like to study art history at a higher level in general.

After this, I attended the Insights into Art History workshop at the Courtauld Institute itself. This was a wonderful experience that confirmed my new ambitions. It was great to be able to experience a real university lecture and seminar session. We also received interview and personal statement advice.

Nottingham 2Ultimately, the partnership between New College Nottingham and The Courtauld gave me the knowledge and confidence that I needed to pursue my current course. I also believe it has not just benefited those of us that have directly applied to The Courtauld or even a history of art degree but to others applying for other various subjects. History of art in itself is a multidisciplinary subject and I believe the study day taught us all valuable skills in critical, verbal and visual analysis amongst others. The leaders were not at all intimidating despite coming from such a prestigious institute; they were encouraging and the support provided on these workshops gave me the confidence I needed to continue on to higher education.

Meghan Goodeve, Young People’s Programme Coordinator (job-share with Alice Odin) & Art History Beyond London alumna and current BA student at The Courtauld.  

Email: education@courtauld.ac.uk //    Twitter @CourtauldYP

 

Preservative Party (@presparty) 14-24yo dedicated to History & Culture of Leeds

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imageWe are a youth group dedicated to the history and culture of Leeds, working with Leeds Museums And Galleries. We have the opportunity to see exhibits before they are open to the public and help to change the museum spaces and they way they look and work.

Credited to Bev Cottrell Ellie, JP and James handling and reading about tomb pots.

Credited to Bev Cottrell
Ellie, JP and James handling and reading about tomb pots.

Our members are aged between 13-24 and come from a wide range of backgrounds. We are all volunteers and we meet weekly to discuss our projects such as helping to install the upcoming Voices Of Asia exhibition. We participate in other extra museum events and conferences too and sometimes go on group research trips. Of course, a wide range of refreshments are always provided to aid our contributions to the museum!

Our role is to work behind the scenes at Leeds City Museum, forming an integral part of the museum. In the past, we produced a temporary exhibition called ‘Treasured! Smuggled? Stolen? Saved?’, which drew more than 60,000 people. There will hopefully be another entirely youth-curated exhibition in 2016 to mark the centenary of the First World War. We will beginning early work on this project in summer.

Credited to Bev Cottrell. Connor and Tonicha brainstorming during a group discussion.

Credited to Bev Cottrell.
Connor and Tonicha brainstorming during a group discussion.

Recently, a Facebook timeline has been created by our group as part of the centenary commemorations. The timeline has key dates, events and stories related to the First World War in Leeds. We can add to it or people can contribute their own family stories either through us or via their own Facebook account. The main events are added through milestones with symbols to show what theme they are relevant to. The themes include: military, home front, industry, and the role of women. We invite you to see our latest project at www.facebook.com/WW1Leeds.

Furthermore, we organised and delivered some Facebook workshops, these were designed to help people with First World War research and stories to place them on our timeline. This was a great way of getting the community stories to the world! We hope you like our Facebook timeline and please feel free to post/like/share. The Preservative Party welcomes you to send any questions to our Facebook page or to WW1.timeline@leeds.gov.uk.

Preservative Party members helping to design the jewellery display for the upcoming Voices of Asia gallery at Leeds City Museum.

Preservative Party members helping to design the jewellery display for the upcoming Voices of Asia gallery at Leeds City Museum.

By being part of the Preservative Party, we gain valuable experience of teamwork and of how museums work. The people who originally worked on the Facebook timeline also received a Leeds Youth Award, which was presented to them by Councillor Yeadon from Leeds City Council. We enjoy coming to meetings because it is a chance to do something new and different and to meet new people and friends. And of course to drink tea and eat cake and biscuits!

If you would like to find out more about the Preservative Party or are interested in joining the group, please email us at preservativeparty@gmail.com or you can tweet us @presparty. We’d love to hear from you! 

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