Tag Archives: teens in museums

Part #4 Reflective Essay: Teen Ambassador @nmafateens

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Continuation of Teen Ambassadors Program at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African Art Guest Post

Amyra Demonstrating Project Math FestNote: This post was written by Amyra Hasan, a student in the Teen Ambassadors Program, to fulfill the requirements of her capstone project for the “International Studies and Law” academy that she is enrolled in. It is a reflective essay about her experiences during the training portion of the Teen Ambassadors Program.

For most people, Africa began when the Europeans decided that the continent was merely a meal they could slice and take for themselves with no regard to the millions of rich and proud people living there. They devoured Africa, ravaged it, and had the audacity to blame its poor condition on the people themselves. For a lot of people now, Africa and black America is still perceived that way. I, as an Asian, have virtually no ties to this continent. I, as an American, could have easily swallowed this imperialist narrative, the product of a Eurocentric education system, without thinking critically about it and moved on with my life. The problem is that I choked on it.

I could not accept this so passively. Africa is the cradle of humanity; surely it couldn’t be as simple as this right? I kept this idea tucked away in the back of my mind as I refocused on getting through the end of junior year. Afterwards, it came up again as I was considering my career path and my future college plans. I had my heart set out to be a humanitarian working to improve the lives of people in less developed countries like Indonesia, my own country. So far, I joined an International Studies and Law program, but I needed something more concrete. I needed something that would give me firsthand experience with different cultures other than my own, something that would simultaneously aid in developing practical skills and broaden my worldview.

Working as a teen ambassador for the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African Art not only fit all of these requirements exactly, but it also answered these burning questions I had about Africa. I gained confidence when I gained friends in such a short span of time. I developed my social skills as I slowly got to work more and more with the public. I came home with newfound passion that I realized I hadn’t felt in years: talking excitedly about everything that happened that day, feeling satisfied and productive as I watched those previously empty weekend hours fill up quickly with schedules.

Even though the artistic aspect of the program was not initially my main interest, I realized art is much more valuable than what most people, including me, give it credit for. Art can be a conversation starter into deeper issues about society, which is precisely what I plan to do as a humanitarian and advocate. I may not work specifically with African countries in the future, but it was especially during this experience I vowed to do my best to bring awareness to the hundreds of diverse societies living inside it. I want to show people that Africa is not one monolithic culture ravaged by disease and poverty, but it is just as capable as anyone else of producing unique and beautiful art. On a general level, I want to show people that all art is equally beautiful and equally valuable, just as all people are.

This is really what extracurricular opportunities, such as the Teen Ambassadors Program, strive to achieve. As Americans, we don’t realize the enormous amount of privilege we have. Our public education system teaches to standardized test after standardized test, leaving no room to learn to appreciate the world for how it is and to learn how to make it a better place. By experiencing Teen Ambassadors as an extracurricular program, I learned that practical experience is just as crucial to being a well-rounded person as a classroom education. I refuse to be passive about the ideas I consume. Like getting nervous before a tour, I must learn to hold it down and speak with conviction, to take an active role in my life so I can help other people do the same in theirs.

 

Part #3: More Lessons Learned and Big Questions from Case Study @nmafateens

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We’ve been quiet on the Teens in Museum blog about the Teen Ambassadors Program at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African Art, but that doesn’t mean that we haven’t been busy. Quite the contrary! It’s been a busy few weeks for our Teen Ambassadors, as we launched into the nitty-gritty of training: learning the building blocks for a tour. In the meantime, we’ve also had the opportunity to provide our students with special opportunities, such as the chance to attend the press preview and opening for the Divine Comedy exhibition, and a chance to sit down with our head of Public Affairs and chief librarian to discuss a range of careers available in museums.

Over the past few weeks, our Teen Ambassadors were ask to select two artworks in our Conversations exhibit that they loved, and then respond to these pieces. They then researched these artworks and pieces, and then gave a five-minute talk in the public galleries on their findings. After we gave the students feedback, each student chose a partner whose selected artworks corresponded with his or her pieces. The students then worked on discussing comparisons between the pieces and elarning their partner’s works. These pieces will be the building blocks of their tours. Our work with the students over the last few weeks has provided us with several “lessons learned” and reflective opportunities.

Lesson #1: Get all relevant medical information from your program participants.
One of our participants has a reoccurring medical condition that occurred while at our program. Although it was not serious, we had no prior knowledge on this condition, or on any other medical conditions or allergies that the students have. From this incident, we learned that we have to collect documentation on any medical conditions or special needs that might affect our programming. For future teen programs, we plan on beginning with a parent meeting, where we will provide confidential worksheets for parents to fill out regarding medical conditions and other information. It seems obvious in hindsight, but in our rush of planning curriculums and envisioning a program, we overlooked this basic step, and we definitely learned a lesson we won’t for’et.

Lesson #2: Provide specific guidelines about what we want from the teens.
When we assigned the students “Interpretive Challenge” research assignments on two artworks that they selected from the Conversations exhibit, they were the five-minute gallery presentation we wanted them to develop. While the student presentations on a whole were really good, the students’ research was not as rigorous as we’d have liked to have seen. Our “Interpretive Challenge” activity was modified from an exercise completed by our adult docents. Many of our adult docents have advanced degrees and intensive experience in the art world, so when we tell them to “research a piece of art”, they more or less know to draw a broad context around the piece. When we asked kids to do this, they provided really rich interpretations based on their observations and own worldviews, but some of their readings lacked in artist biographies, theme of the exhibitions, and art historical context. While we did some research on our own to add some facts to these pieces, we’d like the kids to do this research in the future. To do this, we realize we need to ask our kids to answer very specific questions in their research (such as “give three facts about the artist”). For our first round of Teen Ambassadors, we helped write up some additional research and interpretation for them, but this led us to grapple with our educational philosophy and led to our first big question, which we think might be shared by anyone doing a basic program.

Big Question: How much of the tour should be generated by us, and how much should be generated by the kids?
We have a great group of kids; they make great observations when given the chance to closely look at art and objects, they are wonderful storytellers, and they aren’t afraid to let their personalities shine through when talking about art. It was a highlight of our program to give them a chance to research and study pieces and take some ownership over their pieces, and then have a chance to teach their peers about these pieces. However, there are certain basics that we believe that every gallery experience facilitated at NMAfA should include, and certain contexts that we as interpreters should pass on to audiences who are familiar with art but may be new to non-Western art. At the same time, we don’t want our students to be reading off a script. So how to balance? We’ve been experimenting with scripting certain elements of the student’s tours—introductions and conclusions, for example, which we’ve noticed that any new docent or educator may struggle with—and we’ve given them additional facts to sprinkle through the gallery. It’s still a give-and-take process as we experiment with what works and what doesn’t, so we look forward to thinking more on that in the next few weeks.

Lesson #3: Spend as much time as possible in the galleries.
Many of our early sessions were held in our executive conference room, but I realized when the students were giving their gallery presentations that they seemed much more relaxed in the conference rooms than they did in the galleries. As it’s Cherry Blossom season in DC, the past few weeks have been really crowded with tourists. Couple that with some really sensitive alarms in the gallery, it’s no wonder that the galleries are unfamiliar and a bit scary to the kids (honestly, during the Cherry Blossom Festival, the galleries are a bit scary to me!) Our last session was spent almost entirely in the galleries however, and I realized the need of being in the galleries as much as possible in the future. I like to think of learning as one of the more elevated blocks on Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. In order for learning to happen, the more basic needs—comfort, security, etc—need to be met. By providing kids the opportunity just to hang out and be themselves in the gallery, we are building their comfort levels so they can properly study and learn the artworks. They’ll then be able to convey that to the audiences that they’ll start working with in the next month.

Speaking of the future, we’re onto recruiting for a summer class of Teen Ambassadors! Reflecting as part of the Teens in Museums blog has been very beneficial for my own program planning, and I look forward to having the chance to implement my own lessons learned.

Photos:Teens at Press Preview

We’ve been trying to expand the range of opportunities available to our Teen Ambassadors by tapping them into other Museum events. Here, Teen Ambassadors Nick and Emily attended the press preview for The Divine Comedy. Emily writes for her school’s newspaper, and will write an article about her experiences. Both had the opportunity to mingle with museum staff, artists, and professional journalist.

Julia presents in the gallery.
Julia Gallery Presentation

Amyra, Emily and Nick after the press preview.
Nick Emily Amyra

From the Underground Up: Building a Teen Docent Program at Smithsonian’s National Museum of African Art @nmafateens

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Please note: We are please to announce Alli Hartley will be sharing an on-going series of post on what it is like to set up a Teen Docent program.  We hope this inspires conversations so please feel free to leave comments or tweet @nmafateens or us at @teensinmuseums

By:Alli Hartley is the Teen Ambassador Programs Intern

This spring at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African Art, I have been tasked with building a “Teen Ambassador Program” for teens to volunteer with us throughout the museum. For those who are unfamiliar with us, the National Museum of Art is located on the National Mall in Washington D.C. Our mission is to inspire conversations about the beauty, power and diversity of African arts and cultures worldwide. We’re excited this spring to provide teens with the tools to promote cross-cultural understandings of Africa among our museum audiences.

Screen Shot 2015-02-28 at 5.40.21 PMThe program launches Saturday February 28th , and the teens will participate in various trainings on weekends during the spring, before giving special teen tours to groups of other teens and eventually the general public in the early summer. The teens will also interact with the public by facilitating art carts. Teen Ambassadors will study artworks in our collection, but they will also have a chance to learn gallery teaching techniques used by museum educators worldwide. We will give our Ambassadors the opportunity to learn more about careers in the arts through interactions with museum staff across a range of departments as well as staff in other Smithsonian institutions. These interactions will include “meet the museum” sessions, during which staff from departments within our museum discuss their projects and careers, and cross-trainings with teen programs at other Smithsonian museums. Our anticipated outcomes include building leadership skills for the teens that can be applied to future careers both inside and outside of the arts, as well as unique exposure to art and -art-related career options.

Continue reading →

#MysteryTour programme returns – January to March 2015 @wipartsuk and @priorityfive

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Are you aged in 11-25, based in Birmingham/West Midlands region and interested in being a young consultant for heritage venue? Well this programme is for you!

The Mystery Tour programme is back for 2015 and we have lots of very exciting venues that we will be visiting this year across the West Midlands region.

Below is some information where we will be going.
Get involved in the Mystery Tour Programme, please follow the link and fill out your contact details here

 

UPCOMING DATES
1) Saturday 24th January 2015: Red House Glass Cone in Stourbridge
Red House Glass Cone
Lying in the heart of the Stourbridge glassmaking industry, the Red House Glass Cone was built at the end of the 18th century and was used for the manufacture of glass until 1936. Reaching 100 feet, it is the only complete Glass Cone in the area and one of only four left in the United Kingdom. With the aid of film, audio guides, exhibits and live demonstrations, you can now explore the Cone’s 200 years of glassmaking history.

 

2) Saturday 31st January 2015: Mystery Tour visioning day at The Drum

On this day we will be reflecting on past visits and visioning for the future of this project. We are looking to formally recruit Heritage Ambassadors who will be working with the Mystery Tour team to attend conferences and events, share their knowledge and give specialist advice and guidance to organisations, share the story of the Mystery Tour programme to date, and help to invite new young people to take part in the project.

 

3) Wednesday 18th February 2015: Aston Hall

 

Aston Hall

 

Aston Hall is a grade 1 listed Jacobean House located in Aston and built between 1618 and 1635. In 1864 the house was bought by Birmingham Corporation, becoming the first historic country house to pass into municipal ownership, and is now a community museum managed by Birmingham Museums Trust. It boasts a series of period rooms which have furniture, paintings, textiles and metalwork from the collections of the Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery.

 

4) Saturday 21st February 2015: Heritage Motor Centre

 

Heritage Motor Centre

The Heritage Motor Centre is home to the world’s largest collection of British Cars; it boasts nearly 300 cars in its collection which span the classic, vintage and veteran eras and is a mecca for car enthusiasts.

5) Saturday 28th February 2015: The Old House
The Old House

 

The Old House is a remarkably well preserved example of a 17th Century timber-framed building and is situated in the heart of Hereford, surrounded by the commercial centre of the city. Built in 1621, it is a startling sight, standing as the sole reminder of times-gone-by in the middle of a modern shopping precinct. It is furnished in period style with an internationally important collection of English Oak furniture and rare wall-paintings.

 

Hereford Museum and Art Gallery
hereford-library

 

Hereford Museum and Art Gallery, housed in a spectacular Victorian gothic building, has been exhibiting artefacts and works of fine and decorative art connected with the local area since 1874. Although the exterior of the building has changed very little the museum and gallery have kept up with the times. Exhibits include a hive of live bees, a two-headed calf, a two metre long fish, swords of every shape and size, elements of costume and textiles and much more besides.

 

6) Saturday 7th March 2015: Soho House

 

Soho House

 

Soho House was once a regular meeting place for some of the greatest minds of the 18th century. It was in the dining room of this elegant house that Matthew Boulton, one of the country’s first industrialists, entertained the leading scientists and inventors of the industrial age including James Watt, Erasmus Darwin, Josiah Wedgwood and Joseph Priestly where they discussed ideas and presented discoveries that continue to affect our lives today.

 

7) Saturday 21st March 2015: Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery
Shrewsbury museum

 

Shrewsbury Museum and Art Gallery is set in a remarkable group of historic buildings including the town’s old Music Hall. The collections offer people imaginative opportunities to actively engage in Shropshire’s heritage and help them to experience the unique offer of which the County provides. They currently have a temporary exhibition called ‘Secret Eygpt’ with 150 objects including statuary, coffins, ceramics, jewellery and animal and human mummies.

 

Shropshire Regimental Museum
Shropshire Regimental Museum

Based at Shrewsbury Castle, the Shropshire Regimental Museum Trust includes pictures, uniforms, medals, silverware, weapons and other artefacts from the 18th Century to the present day. The oldest parts of the Castle were built during the reign of William the Conqueror and it became a major border fortress in the Middle Ages. After falling into disrepair in the 1300s, the Castle was revived to become a domestic residence in the late 16th century. Refortified and briefly besieged during the Civil Wars, the Castle was returned to a domestic use under Charles II. In the late 18th century Thomas Telford remodelled the Great Hall as a private house, which it remained until just after World War One.

If you would like to be involved in the Mystery Tour Programme, please follow the link and fill out your contact details: http://goo.gl/forms/r94xZq1UvX.

 

Any further queries in the meantime, please drop me a line - holly@workinprogress.uk.com.

 

Follow us at @wipartsuk and @priorityfive // #mysterytour.
 
 

 

Review of mystery shoppers Lichfield @WiPArtsUK / @priorityfive 

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@priorityfiveSo, to introduce myself,  I am a recently employed apprentice for Work In Progress my name is Jamie Scott . This review, as you may notice from title, is about our mystery shoppers programme which I assist as a support  to the coordinators and facilitators and to handle the documentary side of our project.

With our mystery shoppers project we work in partnership with a vast amount of museums to help them attract a younger generation of the community because, lets face it, museums are not a hotspot attraction for young people!

I can speak for myself regarding this matter because I am also one of those young people who had assumed all museums are boring.  I suppose I  had this approach because I never took interest in them or no one ever suggested going when I was younger.  It was all about going to the cinemas or playing pool with my friends, so really museums would be a last choice hotspot to be honest.

So, thinking about the programme, we basically work with museums and bring in a group of young people who will visit the venues and browse the many features it has to offer and then give their feedback on how the museums can make it more attractive to the younger generation!

Here are a few pictures I took from our recent trip to Litchfield which I edited leftleft top

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some of the young people like to channel their feedback in a creative way (as seen above) so once the young people have had a tour of the venue, we as a group, and the museum sit down and have a group discussion. We spoke about what features they like best also what they could improve on. How they could input changes in order to make it more young people friendly and accessible to all people, who may not be as fortunate to experience the features that the venue has to offer due to certain physical disabilities.  

Samuel Johnson Birthplace Museum Lichfield center This was our first stop in Lichfield one of two venues we were visiting and the first assessment began. As I followed the young people around the building the structure consisted of 5 floors each containing certain historic pieces relating to the man himself Samuel Johnson. As the young people toured the building they took notes. These were then presented to the venues employee’s and we discussed the positives and the negatives. I managed to capture some of the moments which are below.

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Erasmus Darwin House

This was the second and our final venue of the day fresh from having our lunch we headed over to the Erasmus Darwin House where we were  greeted by a wonderful cared for garden that the venue looked after. Once  we had made our way through the garden we were greeted by the employees of the museum and ran through the health and safety procedures.

Once inside, there were suggestions to work your way through the building starting from the bottom floor working your way up. There were two floors to this venue, the young people’s interests seemed to be similar to the other venue, very interested in dressing up! They all managed to influence all the other young people into taking part  also the two deliverers of the project Liz Howell and Ruth Richardson. We had a tour of the venue and we had another brief review given by the young people to the employee’s of the venue about their favourite and not so favourite things.

There were a lot of favorites in this venue similar the first, so the review went rather well, the one thing that seemed to be a bit of a let down from one of the young person’s review named Hamsah, who couldn’t access the many features due to a physical disability which meant he was unable to touch or reach elements of the exhibits because it was all mounted in a difficult hard-to-reach way. He was unable to touch, to feel the texture or smell when there were certain scented items.

He was very concerned about the lack of accessibility for disabled people when he questioned why there was a lift for disabled people to reach the second floor but the access out of the lift included steps!

I felt this was a very good point and something the whole group commented on and we reflected on historic buildings and their access limitations.

Regarding the rest of the review, we gave the young people some stationery and craft bits and they were left to construct a response to a project proposed by Ruth and the team. They then fed back their opinions through their creativeness and in ways that they enjoy including written word, mind maps, art pieces and group drawings. This was also reviewed by one the venue’s employee’s. I’m looking forward to the next trip and to hear the outcome and reaction or changes that are made by these two Lichfield venues!

Teen Team – High Museum of Art @HighMuseumofArt

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TeenTeamMy name is Saaleha, I’m 16 years old, and I’m currently a member of the Teen Team at the High Museum of Art. The Teen Team is a group of 15 high school students who share a common interest in art. They work with the museum to plan teen nights and events, learn about the Museum’s exhibitions and collections, and take part in the variety of tasks it takes to run a Museum. Being able to work on the Teen Team has been a wonderful experience thus far. It’s a great opportunity to learn about the arts, express creativity, and meet a variety of interesting, creative, and successful people.

This year the Teen Team is coordinating a film festival for teens. The Reel Riot Film Festival will be held at the High Museum of Art on July 31, 2014 from 9 to 11pm. Our call for submissions is currently open to any teen filmmaker now through July 7th. To learn more information about the film festival, you can go to this website: The Reel Riot Film Festival will be free and open to the public.
To keep up with what the Teen Team is doing follow us on the following social media sites:
Tumblr: minorriot.tumblr.com
Instagram: @minorriot

Guest Blog: Courtauld Institute of Art Young People’s Programme @CourtauldYP

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Introduction:

Nottingham 1The Courtauld Institute of Art’s young people’s programme is unusual in its function compared to most other galleries. The Courtauld itself has two sides: the Gallery that holds a world-renowned collection spanning 900 years, and The Institute which is the leading centre for the study of art history in the UK. It is this meeting of a gallery and higher education that gives the young people’s programme a specific framework to work within. Known as ‘widening participation’ within the UK higher education sector, this has become one of the key aims of The Courtauld’s new Public Programmes Department since it was established in June 2007. This aim is that not only art and culture should be available to everyone whatever their economic background or personal circumstances, but studying at The Courtauld should be within all young people’s reach.

As a small, single-subject university teaching art history, which is mainly absent from state school curricula, The Courtauld Institute of Art faces an unusual challenge in its widening participation programme. Taking on this challenge we have a number of programmes including Art History Beyond London. Established in 2012, this programme builds partnerships with schools and FE colleges outside London. The sessions are designed to raise awareness of contemporary art history, at the same time as promoting The Courtauld as a potential university destination. They are held in part at schools and in part at local art galleries including Nottingham Contemporary, Site Gallery, and Manchester Art Gallery. Twenty students attended the pilot of this programme, held in Nottingham, and I am now happy to report that two students from this took up a place on the BA course in September 2013, and another will begin in September 2014.

One of these students wanted to talk to you about her experience of the Art History Beyond London programme, so here she is!

Sheffield 2 I first heard about The Courtauld Institute of Art through my History of Art A level course at New College Nottingham after discovering that many of the artworks I was studying were at The Courtauld Gallery. I later experienced the Institute itself through The Courtauld’s outreach programme, Art History Beyond London, a number of workshopsheld at New College Nottingham. The day included learning the methodologies of art history, how to read an image,a curation mini-task and visit to Nottingham Contemporarywhere I was exposed to video artist’s Mika Rottenberg’s video art. Her exploration of capitalism’s cruelties, closed communities and the hardship experienced by labourers in a world of globalisation drew me further into the concepts in modern art.

The day was a rare opportunity to speak to a representative from The Courtauld to understand not just the possibilities that The Courtauld Institute can offer but also gave me a stronger grasp of what it could be like to study art history at a higher level in general.

After this, I attended the Insights into Art History workshop at the Courtauld Institute itself. This was a wonderful experience that confirmed my new ambitions. It was great to be able to experience a real university lecture and seminar session. We also received interview and personal statement advice.

Nottingham 2Ultimately, the partnership between New College Nottingham and The Courtauld gave me the knowledge and confidence that I needed to pursue my current course. I also believe it has not just benefited those of us that have directly applied to The Courtauld or even a history of art degree but to others applying for other various subjects. History of art in itself is a multidisciplinary subject and I believe the study day taught us all valuable skills in critical, verbal and visual analysis amongst others. The leaders were not at all intimidating despite coming from such a prestigious institute; they were encouraging and the support provided on these workshops gave me the confidence I needed to continue on to higher education.

Meghan Goodeve, Young People’s Programme Coordinator (job-share with Alice Odin) & Art History Beyond London alumna and current BA student at The Courtauld.  

Email: education@courtauld.ac.uk //    Twitter @CourtauldYP

 

The Youth Arts, Culture and Heritage Event @thinktankmuseum

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Guest Blog by Holly Beaumont-Wilkes

1969132_10152674295817388_1324597657_nThe Youth Arts, Culture and Heritage Event aimed to provide young people across the West Midlands with a forum for debate about leadership and decision making opportunities in art, heritage and culture. Organised and run by Priority 5, an Arts Connect West Midlands pilot research project formed entirely of young people, ‘The Event’ also aimed to mobilise the next generation of young leaders by encouraging and inspiring them to have their say about local arts, heritage and culture.

1383793_10152674287787388_1507369606_nAs a Steering Group member, it was great to be part of a project that embraced young, creative talent instead of patronising or dismissing it. We were able to express our opinions and help create an event that we would actually want to attend. Young people were pressed to utilise their talents by taking control of different parts of the day, such as being in control of social media or designing the event space.

Special guests included Jake Orr, Artistic Director and Founder of A Younger Theatre, who spoke about his own experience of youth leadership and decision-making. We also had inspirational speeches from Anisa Haghdadi, Founder and CEO of Beatfreeks, and Dan Bridgewater, Founder and CEO of Fourth Wall Theatre Company. It was really motivating to hear speeches from young people who had already made their mark on the West Midlands arts, heritage and culture scene.

1234664_10152674289657388_1958559226_nThere were debates, workshops and performances throughout the day as well as opportunities for young people to share their stories and ideas. Arts, heritage and cultural organisations from across the West Midlands were also invited to provide information on volunteering, internships, apprenticeships and careers. The day was rounded off by an after party with an open mic that showcased local talent.

‘The Event’ was a truly inspiring day packed full of passionate young people who were dedicated to help shape the future of arts, culture and heritage across the West Midlands. It made me feel like my opinions do truly matter by creating a safe medium in which I could share them. It has inspired me to continue to look for leadership opportunities in this sector as I now believe my skills and experiences are valuable, and can help to make a difference. I am very proud of everyone who worked so hard to make this event happen, and very privileged to have been given the opportunity to be a part of this project.

If you would like to join the Steering Group and be part of the movement, please contact Ruth Richardson on Ruth.Richardson@wlv.ac.uk or 07837 734275 for more information.

Guest Blog: Geffrye Museum Youth Panel as seen from a Member @GeffryeYouth

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Photogirls Wallace Event 24Jan14 16My name is Rosie Bayliss; I’m 17 and I’ve been a member of the Geffrye Museum Youth Panel (called the ‘YAP’) for approximately nine months now. The YAP is a way for young people (aged 14-24) to volunteer, leading them to gain a vast range of skills, which will later on be transferable to many different roles in the working world. The Geffrye Museum YAP is a very friendly and welcoming group, which means that everyone gets a chance to voice their opinion on the points of discussion. In our last YAP meeting I signed up for a training day on ‘Networking and Presentation Skills’ which was run by the East London Business Alliance (ELBA); this is an example of one of the many opportunities offered.

I joined the Geffrye Museum YAP as I am aiming to gain a career in museum/ gallery education, and I feel highly passionate about getting young people more involved with galleries and museums. I believe it is important for younger generations to grow up and appreciate history and to see how we have learnt about this history i.e. through sculpture, painting and architecture and also to appreciate the arts. The Geffrye Museum Youth Panel allows me to get involved with this; it allows me to get involved with creating events but also the other aspects behind the event, such as the marketing side.

The YAP Take-over event – ‘Royal Wonders @ the Wallace, The Wallace Collection:

 Wallace Event Jan14 92A typical Youth Panel meeting begins with an introduction, everyone is given an agenda sheet, which summarises the different points we will be talking about. During our meeting on Monday 13th January, we discussed further details of our upcoming event at the Wallace Collection, ‘Royal Wonders @ the Wallace’. We had two members of staff from the Wallace Collection attending the meeting, whom we have been collaborating with over ideas for the event over lots of YAP meetings in order to make the event a huge success. I was particularly keen on being involved with this event, as it is similar to the work that I would like to pursue. 

Our event at the Wallace Collection, ‘Royal Wonders @ the Wallace,’ was really successful. The Wallace Collection is a national museum that displays works of art that were collected in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries by the first four Marquesses of Hertford and Sir Richard Wallace, the 4th Marquess of Hertford’s son. It was exciting to be able to hold an event here amongst many great works of art and it was the perfect place to hold our Royalty-themed event. In our YAP meetings we decided on having six different activities, all set in different rooms. These workshops ranged from ‘The Royal Treatment’, where you could dress up in armour, accessories and gowns and then have a photograph taken capturing your new royal look, to ‘Regal Portraits’ where you could have a caricature artist draw you as a current or past royal figure.  The YAP was really pleased with the outcome of the event and had a great time pretending to be a royal for a night!

 

 

Guest Blog: @TeenArtGallery Cabinets of Wonder: The Art of Collecting

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Guest Blog: Charlotte Lee, Director T.A.G.

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Nina Naghshineh, Shoe 2, clay, acrylic paint

Last summer, Teen Art Gallery received an email from the staff at The Children’s Museum of New York, asking about the possibility of a collaboration. T.A.G director, Charlotte Lee and team member, Cliff Tang sat down with them in the Fall and came up with a plan. The museum had a show of professional artists planned for February called Cabinets of Wonder: The Art of Collecting. The museums Youth program, Young Artist Kollective, (grades 6-9 ) were working on creating pieces along the same lines of the theme. TAG sat down with them to brainstorm. We taught them a bit about our curatorial and submissions process and then we presented them with a selection of works that we felt fit the theme. This was not simple because many of our submissions did not relate exactly to this theme. The students, however, found connections, made their selections and a show was born called Assembling Identity: Who We Are, What We Collect.

It includes art from the museums YAK program and 6 T.A.G artists :  Kaleigh Acevedo,  Savannah Carlin, Sasha Frolova, Henry Liddy, Mary Munshower, and Nina Naghshineh

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Mary Munshower, Happy Birthday, digital photography

Teen Art Gallery is a unique gallery created entirely by teenagers who curate and organize it. T.A.G’s mission is to give teen artists the opportunity to have their artwork exhibited in a gallery setting.  Teen Art Gallery provides a public platform for teen voices.  Since its founding in 2010, TAG has mounted 7 exhibitions in New York City of artists ages 12-19 and is in the planning stages of a show for June 2014

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