Tag Archives: Young People

The @JewishMuseumLDN Anti-Valentines Event

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In the post Sahava Baranow, project manager at the Jewish Museum’s Anti-Valentine Event, shares what the event was all about:

flyerDuring an early morning seminar in the first couple of weeks of the MA Museum Studies at UCL, our degree coordinator approached the class with a potential project. The Jewish Museum was planning a Late event that would be developed by students to go with their temporary exhibition Blood that drew together art, film and literature to present a rich exploration of how blood can unite and divide. The aim of the event was to attract a younger and culturally engaged audience. It sounded like a great chance to get some practical experience and take part in something innovative and enjoyable. Five of us were interested and the Jewish Museum got in touch to set up an initial meeting and explain our individual roles.

One project manager, three programmers, and one marketing officer would develop the event. The Jewish Museum was going to support us wherever possible, but we were in charge. Having managed some projects in the past, I decided to go for the role of project manager. Managing a project of this size and meeting the expectations of the museum, our degree coordinator, and all of my friends who had promised to come along created a lot of pressure to deliver a successful event, but besides being nervous, I was also excited. Continue reading →

Guest Blog: Courtauld Institute of Art Young People’s Programme @CourtauldYP

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Introduction:

Nottingham 1The Courtauld Institute of Art’s young people’s programme is unusual in its function compared to most other galleries. The Courtauld itself has two sides: the Gallery that holds a world-renowned collection spanning 900 years, and The Institute which is the leading centre for the study of art history in the UK. It is this meeting of a gallery and higher education that gives the young people’s programme a specific framework to work within. Known as ‘widening participation’ within the UK higher education sector, this has become one of the key aims of The Courtauld’s new Public Programmes Department since it was established in June 2007. This aim is that not only art and culture should be available to everyone whatever their economic background or personal circumstances, but studying at The Courtauld should be within all young people’s reach.

As a small, single-subject university teaching art history, which is mainly absent from state school curricula, The Courtauld Institute of Art faces an unusual challenge in its widening participation programme. Taking on this challenge we have a number of programmes including Art History Beyond London. Established in 2012, this programme builds partnerships with schools and FE colleges outside London. The sessions are designed to raise awareness of contemporary art history, at the same time as promoting The Courtauld as a potential university destination. They are held in part at schools and in part at local art galleries including Nottingham Contemporary, Site Gallery, and Manchester Art Gallery. Twenty students attended the pilot of this programme, held in Nottingham, and I am now happy to report that two students from this took up a place on the BA course in September 2013, and another will begin in September 2014.

One of these students wanted to talk to you about her experience of the Art History Beyond London programme, so here she is!

Sheffield 2 I first heard about The Courtauld Institute of Art through my History of Art A level course at New College Nottingham after discovering that many of the artworks I was studying were at The Courtauld Gallery. I later experienced the Institute itself through The Courtauld’s outreach programme, Art History Beyond London, a number of workshopsheld at New College Nottingham. The day included learning the methodologies of art history, how to read an image,a curation mini-task and visit to Nottingham Contemporarywhere I was exposed to video artist’s Mika Rottenberg’s video art. Her exploration of capitalism’s cruelties, closed communities and the hardship experienced by labourers in a world of globalisation drew me further into the concepts in modern art.

The day was a rare opportunity to speak to a representative from The Courtauld to understand not just the possibilities that The Courtauld Institute can offer but also gave me a stronger grasp of what it could be like to study art history at a higher level in general.

After this, I attended the Insights into Art History workshop at the Courtauld Institute itself. This was a wonderful experience that confirmed my new ambitions. It was great to be able to experience a real university lecture and seminar session. We also received interview and personal statement advice.

Nottingham 2Ultimately, the partnership between New College Nottingham and The Courtauld gave me the knowledge and confidence that I needed to pursue my current course. I also believe it has not just benefited those of us that have directly applied to The Courtauld or even a history of art degree but to others applying for other various subjects. History of art in itself is a multidisciplinary subject and I believe the study day taught us all valuable skills in critical, verbal and visual analysis amongst others. The leaders were not at all intimidating despite coming from such a prestigious institute; they were encouraging and the support provided on these workshops gave me the confidence I needed to continue on to higher education.

Meghan Goodeve, Young People’s Programme Coordinator (job-share with Alice Odin) & Art History Beyond London alumna and current BA student at The Courtauld.  

Email: education@courtauld.ac.uk //    Twitter @CourtauldYP

 

The Youth Arts, Culture and Heritage Event @thinktankmuseum

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Guest Blog by Holly Beaumont-Wilkes

1969132_10152674295817388_1324597657_nThe Youth Arts, Culture and Heritage Event aimed to provide young people across the West Midlands with a forum for debate about leadership and decision making opportunities in art, heritage and culture. Organised and run by Priority 5, an Arts Connect West Midlands pilot research project formed entirely of young people, ‘The Event’ also aimed to mobilise the next generation of young leaders by encouraging and inspiring them to have their say about local arts, heritage and culture.

1383793_10152674287787388_1507369606_nAs a Steering Group member, it was great to be part of a project that embraced young, creative talent instead of patronising or dismissing it. We were able to express our opinions and help create an event that we would actually want to attend. Young people were pressed to utilise their talents by taking control of different parts of the day, such as being in control of social media or designing the event space.

Special guests included Jake Orr, Artistic Director and Founder of A Younger Theatre, who spoke about his own experience of youth leadership and decision-making. We also had inspirational speeches from Anisa Haghdadi, Founder and CEO of Beatfreeks, and Dan Bridgewater, Founder and CEO of Fourth Wall Theatre Company. It was really motivating to hear speeches from young people who had already made their mark on the West Midlands arts, heritage and culture scene.

1234664_10152674289657388_1958559226_nThere were debates, workshops and performances throughout the day as well as opportunities for young people to share their stories and ideas. Arts, heritage and cultural organisations from across the West Midlands were also invited to provide information on volunteering, internships, apprenticeships and careers. The day was rounded off by an after party with an open mic that showcased local talent.

‘The Event’ was a truly inspiring day packed full of passionate young people who were dedicated to help shape the future of arts, culture and heritage across the West Midlands. It made me feel like my opinions do truly matter by creating a safe medium in which I could share them. It has inspired me to continue to look for leadership opportunities in this sector as I now believe my skills and experiences are valuable, and can help to make a difference. I am very proud of everyone who worked so hard to make this event happen, and very privileged to have been given the opportunity to be a part of this project.

If you would like to join the Steering Group and be part of the movement, please contact Ruth Richardson on Ruth.Richardson@wlv.ac.uk or 07837 734275 for more information.

UK: Review of the Wallace Collection Youth Event @GeffryeYouth

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Eileen’s Review of the Wallace Collection Youth Event on 1st November 2013

My name is Eileen Gbagbo and I am 15 years old. I currently live in Barking, in Essex (UK) and I go to an all girls grammar school in Chelmsford called CCHS. I’ve been a member of the Geffrye Museum’s Youth Advisory Panel since September 2013. I joined the Geffrye YAP as it was a good opportunity to discuss and run events in the museum in collaboration with other young people. I also wanted to do more volunteering and improve my confidence, public speaking and team working skills.

On the 1st of November at 5.30pm, I along with some other friends attended the youth event at the Wallace Collection, a museum in central London. The event was aimed at University students, however, I was there as part of the Geffrye Youth Advisory Panel to view a youth event being run in the Wallace Museum as, in January 2014, the Geffrye YAP would be running an event there. Also, as I had never been to the Wallace Collection, I was interested to see the collection and the building as I had heard previously that it was very stunning.

The Wallace Collection is a national museum in an historic London townhouse. Most of the displays are of French 18th century paintings, furniture and porcelain with beautiful Old Master paintings and world class armoury. There was a Vivienne Westwood theme to the event. There were workshops such as creating your own masks, face painting and photography. The event was really classy (like the collection). The workshops were really engaging; however, I felt that that the event could have been even more engaging maybe by adding music and more workshops around the Vivienne Westwood theme. I had never seen anything like this, as it was mainly aimed at University students and there was a really nice, mature feeling to the event. From the event I learnt how to make a time- lapse film recording.

Overall, I really enjoyed the event, and having the opportunity to see how an event would be run really helped me and the YAP make decisions as to what kind of workshops and different elements we would have in our own event at the Wallace Collection on the 24th of January 2014.

 

 

Experience Geffrye YAP with Orlane’s Guest Blog @GeffryeYouth

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Ever wondered what it was like to be part of a Youth Group in a museum?  Here Orlane Doumbe describes her experience.  Thanks for sharing Orlane!

 

By Orlane Doumbe

I joined the Geffrye YAP because I love to help being a part of something big. I love getting involved in activities and helping to organize events is really just a big bonus. I’ve only just joined in September and have only attended one YAP meeting – the atmosphere was so open and friendly, it felt like I’m already a part of the family! In this one meeting alone, I’ve signed up to participate in a half-term Digital Media workshop at the Wallace Collection with the Geffrye and Chocolate Films. Also, I will be able to help with a Chocolate Films upcoming project about London in the eyes of a Londoner. These are just a few of the many things I’ve done in two hours!

In a typical Geffrye YAP meeting, we all eat first. There’s plenty of refreshments for all of us which is very useful for me especially as I go there directly from school! After this, we’re given an agenda and during the meeting we go through as much as we can. We also take votes, sometimes we could watch things in relation to our topic(s) and most of all this is done in a relaxed environment. We also input our ideas in different forms. We can verbally communicate to each other or sometimes we can also write it on a post-it note and read them all out. My favourite thing I’ve gotten out of the Geffrye YAP so far is being able to work with a Digital Media Company for 3 and a half days. I’m so thrilled with this opportunity because I’ve always wanted to learn how to use Media from a professional viewpoint rather than the average Keek video or Instagram picture. If this is what you experience after a single meeting alone, I can’t wait to see what I will do in a year’s time.

I think other young people should join museum youth panels because it’s a really great way to balance literally everything. In museum youth panels you learn so much, you learn about collaboration and teamwork, debating and voting. All these qualities build up your self-confidence which is a key skill especially today. We also learn marketing when doing events, this helps with the financial aspect of it all; as you learn how to organise money in the best way possible. This is shown when you’re given a project and you’re given a budget to spend on the project. Not only this, it’s a great CV enhancement as it shows that you’re not just someone with their heads in books 24/7 but you’re an active citizen in your local community.

I think young people will get an open mind when visiting museums because it makes you more aware of the past. It personally motivates me because I think to myself if these people who are dead made such a mark on the earth that even their belongings such as sofas, sculptures etc. are still on display in our generation. I want to be a part of something like that when I’m older, and would then be able to motivate other young people who are looking at the works we’ve done. So visiting museums will enlighten or dishearten your view on history, it will make a difference to your perception of life and it also motivates you to make history yourself.

Guest Blog: Diamond Friends Forever (Antwerp, Belgium) @DFF_DiaMu

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Brent Blockx (24) and Nathalie Brejaart (23) are currently in their final bachelor year Social Work, specilazation Art- and Culture Mediator. The DFF-project is the main goal for their internship and also the subject of their bachelor paper. Both already completed a bachelor as teacher and are active in different cultural organisations.

The Diamond Museum of Antwerp is temporarely without a home. They had to leave their former building to make room for the expansion of an event hall. This, evidently, posed a huge problem…

Where could the collection be displayed now?

DFF-logoThat’s were we, Brent & Nathalie, come in to the equation. We are doing an internship for AmuseeVous, an organization that tries to bring youngsters and museums/culture closer together. For our internship we were already thinking of designing some sort of pop-up museum with real museum objects. The fact that the Diamond Museum went without a building created an excellent opportunity to join forces.

So now we’re given the chance to build a museum from scratch, using objects from the collection of the Diamond Museum. We can tell you this: that’s more than we dared to dream of! Every aspect is left in our (hopefully) capable hands. But we’re not going to do everything ourselves.

In order to create the best experience for youngsters (age 18-26) we are currently attracting other young people to join in. We launched a call that we’re looking for DFF: Diamond Friends Forever. Those Diamonds Friends will form a coreteam (approxamately 10 persons) that will be the principal thinking tank. Nathalie and myself will coach these youngsters.

This bunch of different characters are given the opportunity to spill every crazy idea and thought on how a museum must look and what it must do to be interesting for youngsters. Thus truely creating a museum by and for young people.

Everything is up for discussion: from labels to lighting, from entrancefees to guided tours. The feedback we can gather from this temporarily museum will be used for a publication and will be implemented in the Diamond Museum once it has found a new home. The efforts from the Diamond Friends will be put to good use and not only result in a ‘one-time-thing’.

2013-02-13 11.54.58We’re currently prospecting possible locations for the project in the heart of Antwerp. A few totally different options already passed the revue: an old vault from a former bank, an empty static manor, a youth hostel, a few abandoned stores… We’re trying to look beyond the ‘typical’ locations. But for now our search continues. The location is one of the only elements that the Diamond Friends can’t decide on. And that’s purely because of a limited timeframe and from the point of security issues.The timeframe in a rough draft is as followed: at the beginning of March we’ll set up our think tank of Diamond Friends (which we’re currently selecting). The Diamond Friends will work on the preparations for the pop-up museum till the end of may. Leaving june to set everything up at the location and to prepare the opening which will take place on the 29th of june. The pop-upmuseum will be open from then till August 31st.

You can follow us on Facebook (DFFDiamondFriendsForever) and Twitter (DFF_DiaMu) to be kept up to date of the project. For more on the Diamondmuseum of Antwerp click here. More information on AmuseeVous can be found here.